idesign > Keystones > Ancient Greece Interiors

6th Century BC

 

 

Kline

Diphros

Diphros Okladias

Thronos

Klismos

 

Pictures

Links

help

 

 

 

ancient greece furniture drawings from www.zeno.org

image source: www.zeno.org

 

 

       
Kline  

kline picture from www.mlahanas.de

image source: www.mlahanas.de

 

The Greek Kline is clearly the ancestor of the bed. It is actually a bed, with the only difference that in the past it was also used as a "dining couch" where hosts consumed their meals.

Kline from klino (cause to lean), from which also the word clinic and clinical is derived (that on which one reclines). It was made of wood or bronze, and was often richly adorned. Greek bedsteads were exported to foreign parts. Info source: www.mlahanas.de

       
Diphros  

diphros stool pic from www.architonic.com

image source: www.architonic.com

 

A particular type of seat without backrest. Very simple, very small and particularely light. Its strenght was its functionality: it surely was the easiest object to move around the house.

The Diphros stool design was used in domestic settings as well as in workshops and palaces. The simplicity and utility of the design is a forerunner of the stools and ottomans of modern life. This example displays a carved linear detail on the leg, and a large dowel plug on the blocked corners. Labeled with brass plaque. Info source: www.architonic.com

       
Diphros Okladias  

diphros okladias pic from architonic.com

image source: www.architonic.com

 

In ancient greece, the folding stool was called
'diphros okladias'. its form and ceremonial use
derived directly from egyptian culture.
the 'diphros okladias' did not have a specific
place in the home. its use had become a daily part of life,
in particular for the men and women of rank.
the folding stool consisted of four animal legs
pointed inwards and ending with lion's paws.
as folding stools were ornamented from the beginning,
a folding stool with animal legs represents a natural
evolution towards curved-legs folding-chairs
(see the roman 'sella curulis'). Info source: www.mlahanas.de

       
Klismos  

klismos chair picture from www.mlahanas.de

image source: www.mlahanas.de

 

The Klismos was a particular type of chair which had more gentle curves and a confortable backrest. Many vascular paintings illustrate how this type of chair was particularely diffused among greek women.

It is a light, elegant chair developed by the ancient Greeks. Perfected by the 5th century bc and popular throughout the 4th century bc, the klismos had four curving, splayed legs and curved back rails with a narrow concave backrest between them. Often illustrated on Greek pottery, the design was resurrected in the French Directoire, English Regency, and American Empire styles. Info source: www.britannica.com

       

Thronos

 

throne of Tutankhamen from www.britannica.com

image source: www.britannica.com

 

 

The Thronos, like the other pieces of ancient greece furniture, was inherited from the Egyptians and earlier cultures. It was the most superb object, created exclusively to amuse the most powerful characters and be placed in the foremost temples and sumptuos palaces. Since it appeared in human history, it is always been considered as the most evident symbol of divin and political power.

The throne of Tutankhamen, with carved figures of the young pharaoh and his wife under the rays of the Sun, from his tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Thebes, Egypt; in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. Info source: www.britannica.com

       

Pictures

 

ancient greece pic from designboom.com

image source: www.designboom.com

 

 

klinai pictures from www.utexas.eduimage source: www.utexas.edu

3d reconstruction from www.vizing.orgimage source: www.vizing.org

barcelona chair and ottoman pic from image source: www.chairblog.eu

 

 

 

 

   
       
Links  

ancient greece furniture: www.mlahanas.de

manufacturer link: www.architonic.com

ancient greek life:www.vizing.org

greek triclinae: www.utexas.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
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