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France and U.S.A. 1925 - 1935

 

 

 

Art Decò

Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann

American Art Decò

Decò Furniture

 

 

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art decò armchair pic from www.dorlingkindersley-uk.co.uk

image source: www.dorlingkindersley-uk.co.uk

 

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Art Decò  

art deco interior pic from ruhlmann.info

Info source:ruhlmann.info

art deco commode  pic from www.french-reproduction-furniture.com

image source: www.french-reproduction-furniture.com

 

The "Exposition des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes", or Art Deco Exhibition, opened in Paris in 1925 and the art deco movement was ushered into existence. The term itself, "Art Deco" was, however, coined retrospectively in the nineteen sixties. In the time of the nineteen twenties Art Deco was generally referred to as "Art Moderne" or "Modernistic".

Art deco evolved from a variety of influences including the austere German Bauhaus movement in architecture, cubist styles in painting, and the International Style of design.

In many respects as well Art Deco was a response to, and rejection of, the flowing, natural lines of Art Nouveau furniture of the first decades of the twentieth century and it also incorporated many of the discoveries that had been made at the tomb of King Tutankhamen in Egypt.

As the movement developed over time, and exported itself to other countries, for example in American Art Deco furniture, it was refined and normalised to the point where it became a hugely popular style of furniture. The movement attempted to provide a comprehensive system of design, for architecture, jewelry, scultpure, and interiors

Info source: www.furniturestyles.net

       
Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann  

ruhlmann bedroom interior pic from ruhlmann.info

ruhlmann art deco interior pic from ruhlmann.info

art deco interior by ruhlmann pic from info.ruhlmann

interiors decò by ruhlmann pic from ruhlmann.info

Info source:ruhlmann.info

 

Much of the furniture we build is based on the designs of master Art Deco designer Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann. Ruhlmann led the furniture design movement in Paris from 1914 until 1933, the year of his death. During this period, he was one of the most prolific and imitated designers in history.

His strongest inspiration may have come from the classical design elements and craftsmanship ideals found in 18th century furniture. Ruhlmann would later shape these same ideals into what he called his precious pieces. These pieces, most often occurring between 1918 and 1925 were his favorites. They made use of the rarest woods such as Macassar ebony, Brazilian rosewood, and amboyna burl, usually in combination with each other. Most of the forms were very simple, making use of gentle, almost imperceptible curves. These pieces were most often embellished with ivory; used for handles, dentil, feet, and inlay. The ivory brought a static sense of control to the pieces that made them unique, timeless and extremely elegant in form.

When examining Ruhlmann's furniture, take notice of the subtle use of grain. Ruhlmann was careful not to allow the figure of the wood to vie for attention with the form of the furniture. His two favorite woods; Macassar ebony and amboyna burl both create soft but striking background patterns, without focusing attention on the wood itself. This allowed the veneers to support the design details instead of competing with them.

Info source:ruhlmann.info

       
American Decò  

a book about art deco from http://www.artdecosociety.org/about/events/regional.htm

image source: www.artdecosociety.org

crysler building pic from http://www.hsart.com/images/chrysler-building_op_432x6002.jpg

image source: www.hsart.com

american art deco pic from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c5/Nash_Ambassador_Slipstream_4-door_sedan.jpg

image source: artist-empire.com

 

Art deco flourished in cities and small towns throughout America during the 1920s and 1930s. Extremely popular as a statement of modernity and technological progress, art deco movie palaces, dime stores, department stores, courthouses, and schools were ubiquitous in the American landscape; numerous examples of the style continue to be viable spaces. Consequently, art deco is one of the few styles of architecture, which the majority of Americans can identify.

American art deco was unique. Unlike their European counterparts, architects in the United States had "exotic" indigenous cultures for inspiration. Arts such as Navajo chiefs' blankets, Hopi pottery, and Sioux beadwork, characterized by geometric ornament, were easily assimilated into the art deco style. Regionalism—a good example of which is the Prairie style, advocated by Frank Lloyd Wright and other progressive architects—also influenced American art deco. America's pioneering and westward migration provided powerful themes and motifs, producing an art deco with authentic national and regional characteristics. Info source: www.artdecosociety.org

       
Decò Furniture  

art deco furniture pic from http://flickr.com/photos/34961066@N00/102404040

image source: flickr.com

art deco table and chairs pic from http://www.stylebydesignltd.co.uk/Art%20Deco%20Table%20&%20Chairs.JPG

image source: www.stylebydesignltd.co.uk

 

The characteristics of French art deco furniture are sleek, smooth, streamlined lines, geometrical patterns, and experimental use of industrial materials such as metals, plastics, and glass. Art deco furniture is modern and functional.

Woods used by art deco furniture makers were very often of the exotic kind such as ebony, frequently used as a veneer, and also much use was made of the technique of laquering. Snakeskin, parchment, and sharkskin were sometimes used for decorative effect. Art deco French furniture was sometimes made of chrome plated steel and forged iron, deliberately modern materials.

One consequence of this use of rare or unusual construction methods and materials was that Art Deco furniture of this era was generally very expensive.Info source:www.furniturestyles.net

         
         
       

Pictures

 

desk deco style pic from www.french-reproduction-furniture.com

image source: www.french-reproduction-furniture.com

 

 

art deco lamp pic from http://www.retrotogo.com/2008/01/noble-designs-c.htmlimage source: www.retrotogo.com

ruhlmann furniture pic from ruhlmann.infoimage source: ruhlmann.info

art deco dressing table pic from www.stylebydesignltd.co.ukimage source: www.stylebydesignltd.co.uk

art deco armchair pic from www.furniturestyles.comimage source: www.furniturestyles.net

soft art deco pic from http://projectdollway.blogspot.com/2008/01/soft-art-deco.htmlimage source: projectdollway.blogspot.com

art deco picture from http://projectdollway.blogspot.com/2008/01/soft-art-deco.htmlimage source: projectdollway.blogspot.com

art deco armchair havana pic from http://www.retrotogo.com/2007/12/little-book-of.htmlimage source: www.retrotogo.com

art decò furniture pic from http://www.imaginedurban.org/index.php/Cultural-Diversity-History-and-Heritage/Durban-Art-Deco-Furniture.htmlimage source: www.imaginedurban.org

art deco facade pic from http://queens.about.com/od/photogalleries/ig/Photos-of-Sunnyside.--0B/Art-Deco-Entrance-.htmimage source: queens.about.com

art decò graphicsimage source: www.flickr.com

 

 

 

 

   
       
Links  

more about Art Decò: www.furniturestyles.net

more about American Art Decò : artist-empire.com , www.artdecosociety.org

more about art decò furniture: www.furniturestyles.net

art decò muebles manufacturer:www.french-reproduction-furniture.com

art decò furniture seller: www.decodesign.co.uk

more about Ruhlmann: ruhlmann.info

 

 

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