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History of Ceramics

Terracotta

Ceramic Tiles

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aalto glass vase

Info source:www.giant.co.uk

 

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Ceramics  

glass design

Info source:asuartmuseum.asu.edu

ceramic vase

Info source:www.archaeometry.gr

ceramics interior bathroom

image source:www.regencyfloorstore.ca

 

The word Ceramic is derived from a Greek word ‘Keramos’ meaning ‘potter’ or ‘pottery’. Keramos in turn was originated from a Sanskrit root – meaning ‘to burn’. Hence, the word Keramos was to infer ‘burned substance’ or ‘burned earth’.

Ceramics have been accompanying the human race since ancient times. Archaeologists have unearthed man-made ceramics that date back to at least 25,000 BC. Primitive Ceramics were made of basic earthen materials like clay and were burnt in domes. Human inventiveness gradually started with firing these articles at higher temperatures to attain harder Ceramic articles. This desire of getting harder substances steered the human races to invent better firing techniques. The human zest and nature’s mystery have come a long way from basic earthen wares to modern world advanced ceramics.

As Ceramics are made of earthen materials, they are the most compatible products with the nature. Ceramics are the only materials which are nature friendly and therefore they are free from decays due to gradual natural impacts like corrosion, erosion, abrasion, thermal shocks, etc. Even though Ceramics are brittle; they are the only materials which subsist to see the races to come. Hence, we may call them a strong-fragile part of human life. Info source:www.khyaticeramics.com

       
Terracotta  

antique greek glass vase pic from http://www.mark-norton-fine-antiques.com/history%20of%20glass.htm

Info source:www.tierrayfuego.com

terra cotta tiles

Info source:www.traditionalreclaimedmaterials.com

chinese imperial terracotta warriors

Info source:www.made-in-china.com

 

 

Terracotta is a ceramic material that has been used for building construction and decorative arts since ancient times in cultures around the world. Terracotta, which literally means "baked earth," is made from natural clay, which gives it a characteristic reddish-brown color. The color varies slightly depending on the clay used. Terracotta may be glazed for extra durability or to provide color. It is a waterproof and very sturdy material, and many ancient terracotta sculptures are still in excellent shape.

Terracotta was widely used in the decorative arts of ancient China, perhaps most famously in the tomb soldiers of 2nd century BCE emperor Qin Shi Huangdi. Terracotta vases and other sculptures are known from ancient Egypt, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, West Africa, and Central and North America. Terracotta pipe was also one of the oldest materials used in plumbing.

Though terracotta largely fell out of use in Europe during the Middle Ages, its use in building and sculpture revived in the Renaissance, and it has remained an important material into the modern era. Construction methods improved over the ages, as terracotta was once baked in the sun, later dried among ashes in the oven, and finally kiln-fired. While terracotta was used to make roof tiles and bricks in the ancient world, it became more versatile as a building material during the Renaissance, when it features in the ornate decorations of buildings in the newly developed Gothic style.

Info source: www.wisegeek.com

Ceramic Tiles  

antique greek glass vase pic from http://www.mark-norton-fine-antiques.com/history%20of%20glass.htm

Info source:www.strawsticksandbricks.com

ceramic tiles common use fast food design

Info source:home.howstuffworks.com

ceramic tile contemporary design

Info source:www.momoy.com

 

  ceramic tile flooring can be found in a variety of settings in diverse cultures and structures, including residential buildings ranging from large apartment buildings to small private houses, institutional buildings such as government offices and schools, and religious buildings such as cathedrals and mosques. Historically, its widespread use may be attributed to the fact that a readily available natural material--clay--could be converted by a relatively simple manufacturing process--baking or firing--into a very durable, long-lasting and attractive floor tile that is easy to maintain. Ceramic floor tiles exhibit a versatility of colored glazes and decoration, and they range from the plainest terra cotta tiles to highly decorated individual ceramic tiles and elaborately patterned tile floors. Their modularity, as standardized units, make them easy to fit into different sized spaces which also explains much of the popularity of ceramic floor tiles throughout history. Info source: www.nps.gov
       
Bricks  

bricks ceramic material

Info source:ibp-international.com

ceramic bricks brickwall

Info source:chieftainwalk.org

ceramic bricks used for flooring

Info source:www.swiftways.com

 

 

 

Clay bricks and tiles form the basis of the European building tradition. They are the link between our architectural heritage and our future.

Whether from ecological, economic or social aspects, clay building products constitute a sustainable option and have favourable lifecycle assessments with comparatively low environmental impact. They are often manufactured in modern, decentralised factories that require low primary energy input and feature equipment to reduce emissions. Due to their good thermal performance, clay building products can enhance the environmental impact of buildings.

Clay building products have a very long lifetime, require little or no maintenance and help minimise heating and cooling costs; they therefore provide optimal economic performance. As a result of these benefits, buildings made from clay building products have a very positive CO2 balance over their lifetime. Last but not least, they are flexible in use and provide excellent living conditions and indoor climate thanks to their porous structure, their mass and high resistanceto fire and moisture. Info source: www.staywithclay.com

 

       
Links  

everithing about ceramics history: www.nps.gov

history of ceramics :www.ceramics.org

more about terracotta: www.wisegeek.com

more about ceramics : www.khyaticeramics.com , www.designboom.com

more about clay bricks : www.staywithclay.com

more about gres : www.domusweb.it

 

 

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