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Deconstructivism

 

Peter Eisenman

Frank Gehry

Zaha Hadid

Daniel Libeskind

 

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ancient greece furniture drawings from www.zeno.org

image source: www.travelblog.org

 

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Deconstructivism  

deconstruvism design by libeskind pic from architecture.about.com

image source: architecture.about.com

decostructivist fire station pic from http://travel.webshots.com/photo/1514102475081317576DhnGkN

image source: travel.webshots.com

hadid deconstructivism pic from http://boohste.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?orderby=updated

image source: boohste.blogspot.com

london metropolitan deconstructivist style pic from

image source: commons.wikimedia.org

gehry disney hall pic from http://inwhichourhero.blogspot.com/2006/09/movies-sketches-of-frank-gehry-2005.html

image source: www.studio-international.co.uk

ghery interior design decostructivism pic from http://greg.org/archive/gehry_cwru_atrium.jpg

image source: greg.org

 

 

In 1988 Philip Johnson and Mark Wigley organized the exhibition “Deconstructivist Architecture” for the Museum of Modern Art that attempted to probe some of the central assumptions regarding architecture’s deepest cultural significance.

Deconstructivism is the conflation of two words: deconstruction and Constructivism. Deconstruction is an approach to reading and language that seeks to uncover the multiple and often conflicting levels of meaning inherent in texts of all kinds. In the 1970s, the work of the French philosopher Jacques Derrida served as the primary source for many architectural theorists interested in the application of deconstruction to architecture. Constructivism is one of the terms used originally to describe Soviet avant-garde architecture of the immediate post-Revolutionary years in Russia. Info source: archilogy.com

Deconstructivism in contemporary architecture stands in opposition to the ordered rationality of Modernism. Though postmodernist and nascent deconstructivist architects published theories alongside each other in the journal Oppositions , that journal's contents mark the beginning of a decisive break between the two movements. Deconstruction took a confrontational stance toward much of architecture and architectural history, wanting to disjoin and disassemble architecture.

While postmodernism returned to embrace—often slyly or ironically—the historical trappings that modernism had shunned, deconstructivism rejects the postmodern acceptance of eclectic historical references and ornament. This rejection aligns it somewhat with the anti-historicism of many modern works, and is a part of its definition as a new movement. Info source: www.absoluteastronomy.com

Deconstructivist buildings often use abstract and non-geometrical forms. They often have no immediately apparent visual logic, often appearing fragmented and having unusual penetrations. The advent of 3D computer modelling has enabled the creation of the complex forms in these buildings, which would previously have been very difficult to design, visualize and engineer. Info source: architypes.net

       
Peter Eisenman  

peter eisenman picture from www.essential-architecture.com

image source: www.guardian.co.uk

house 3 deconstructivism architecture eisenman pic from http://www.dkolb.org/images/house3.jpg

image source: www.dkolb.org

eisneman's aronoff centre deconstructivism style pic from http://www.taringa.net/posts/imagenes/1341227/Arquitecturinga---Megapost-Peter-Eisenman.html

eisnman decostructivim http://luciensteil.tripod.com/katarxis02-1/id51.html

image source: luciensteil.tripod.com

diphros stool pic from www.architonic.com

image source: www.britannica.com

wexner deconstructivism interior

image source: www.universitydistrict.org

 

Peter eisenman was the leader of a loosely knit group of new york architects,
called 'the new york five' (with john hejduk, michael graves, charles gwathmey,
and richard meier) who made an effort to introduce a theory and artistry of architecture
as rigorous as that of the european avant-garde.
he has held teaching positions at cambridge, princeton, harvard, yale,
and ohio state universities. he is currently the irwin s. chanin distinguished professor
of architecture at the cooper union in new york city and a visiting professor
at princeton university. Info source: www.designboom.com

Peter Eisenman is a deconstructivist who shuns the term. He embraces unconventional theories that have shrouded him in controversy.

Originally, some of the architects known as deconstructivists were influenced by the ideas of the French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Eisenman developed a personal relationship with Derrida, but his approach to architectural design was developed long before. Info source: www.kmpfurniture.com

Eisenman drew some philosophical bases from the literary movement Deconstruction, and collaborated directly with Derrida on projects including an entry for the Parc de la Villette
were concerned with the "metaphysics of presence", and this is the main subject of deconstructivist philosophy in architecture theory. The dialectic of presence and absence, or solid and void occurs in much of Eisenman's projects, both built and unbuilt. Both Derrida and Eisenman believe that the locus, or place of presence, is architecture, and the same dialectic of presence and absence is found in construction and deconstruction.

The Wexner Center takes the archetypal form of the castle, which it then imbues with complexity in a series of cuts and fragmentations. A three-dimensional grid, runs somewhat arbitrarily through the building . The grid, as a reference to modernism, of which it is an accoutrement, collides with the medieval antiquity of a castle. Some of the grid's columns intentionally don't reach the ground, hovering over stairways creating a sense of neurotic unease and contradicting the structural purpose of the column
The Wexner Center deconstructs the archetype of the castle and renders its spaces and structure with conflict and difference.Info source: www.absoluteastronomy.com

       
Frank Gehry  

ghery

image source: www.popsci.com

decostructivism interior by ghery pic from http://www.designer-daily.com/frank-gehry%E2%80%99s-first-deconstructivist-building-743

image source: www.designer-daily.com

geehry deconstructivist project pic frm http://www.thecityreview.com/gehgug.html

image source: www.thecityreview.com

ghery bilbao guggenheim pic from http://www.yangsquare.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/bilbao2.jpg

image source:www.yangsquare.com

guggenheim interior deconstructivism  pic from flickr.com

image source:flickr.com

 

From the outset, Gehry conceived of architecture as a form of sculpture, and thought of himself as a visual artist as much as an architect. Many of his friends and early influences were painters and sculptors, and one of his first projects was the Davis Studio and Residence (1968–72), built for the painter Ronald Davis (1937–    ) in Malibu, Calif. Notable in this work were the studio’s unusual trapezoidal shape and its unorthodox cladding of galvanized corrugated steel; both features were consistent with Davis’s prior experience as a sheet metal mechanic and preoccupation with geometry, perspective, and perceptual illusion.

Gehry’s fascination with eccentric, nonrepetitive geometric forms was spurred in the early 1990s by the use of sophisticated computer software, originally developed for the aerospace industry, that allowed him to build curved and polygonal structures of dizzying complexity. He continued to follow the traditional methods of sketching and sculpting in the initial phases of the design process, but detailed modeling, structural analysis, and even the fabrication of customized construction components were all performed by computer. From the early ’90s onward, as Gehry’s commissions grew more expensive and prestigious, his choice of materials became more durable, elegant, and costly.Info source: www.history.com

Refreshingly original and totally American, proceeding as it does from his populist Southern California perspective, Gehry's work is a highly refined, sophisticated and adventurous aesthetic that emphasizes the art of architecture.

Gehry's architecture reflects his keen appreciation for the same social forces that have informed the work of outstanding artists through history, including many contemporaries with whom he often collaborates. His designs, if compared to American music, could best be likened to Jazz, replete with improvisation and a lively unpredictable spirit.

Always open to experimentation, he has as well a sureness and maturity that resists, in the same way that Picasso did, being bound either by critical acceptance or his successes. His buildings are juxtaposed collages of spaces and materials that make users appreciative of both the theatre and the back-stage, simultaneously revealed. Info source: www.pritzkerprize.com

       
Zaha Hadid  

zaha hadid picture from http://www.egodesign.ca/en/article.php?article_id=225

image source: www.egodesign.ca

hadid deconstructivism pic from http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2008/02/the-zaha-hadid-plan-working-backwards-there%E2%80%99s-hope-for-me-still/

image source: www.britannica.com

fire station hadid constructivism pic http://web.tiscali.it/aldolorisrossi/approfondimenti/18_decostruttivismo.htm

image source: web.tiscali.it

decostructivism abu dabi arts pic from www.e-architect.co.uk

image source: www.e-architect.co.uk

dubai opus hadid deconstructivism

image source: www.minusfive.com

 

working out his ideas of neo-modernity in books such as 1977’s Delirious New York. When Hadid graduated in 1977, Koolhaas offered her a job as a partner in his and Elia Zenghelis’s new firm, the Office for Metropolitan Architecture. But she didn’t last long there. Koolhaas described her at the time as “a planet in her own orbit”. Hadid had her own ideas on architecture to nurture. And it was a long incubation. She started teaching at the AA while developing her own brand of neo-modernist architecture, one which went back to modernism’s roots in the constructivism and suprematism of the early 20th century. Her graduation project, a hotel on London’s Hungerford Bridge, was called Malevich’s Tectonik, after the suprematist Kasimir Malevich who wrote in 1928: “we can only perceive space when we break free from the earth, when the point of support disappears.” Hadid’s architecture follows suit, creating a landscape which metaphorically – and, perhaps, one day literally – seems to take off.

Hadid’s architecture denies its own solidity. Short of creating actual forms that morph and change shape – still the stuff of science fiction – Hadid creates the solid apparatus to make us perceive space as if it morphs and changes as we pass through. Perhaps wisely, she talks little about theory. Unlike, say, Daniel Libeskind, she does not say that a shape symbolises this or that. And she wears her cultural identity lightly. Noticeably, and uncharacteristically diplomatically, she has declined to comment on the situation in Iraq. Instead Hadid lets her spaces speak for themselves. This does not mean that they are merely exercises in architectural form. Her obsession with shadow and ambiguity is deeply rooted in Islamic architectural tradition, while its fluid, open nature is a politically charged riposte to increasingly fortified and undemocratic modern urban landscapes. Info source: www.designmuseum.org

Zaha Hadid’s buildings are today among the most convincing arguments for the primacy of architecture in the production of space. What she has achieved with her inimitable manipulation of walls, ground planes and roofs, with those transparent, interwoven and fluid spaces, are vivid proof that architecture as a fine art has not run out of steam and is hardly wanting in imagination. Info source: www.pritzkerprice.com

       

Daniel Libeskind

 

daniel libeskind deconstructivism pic http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Daniel_Libeskind.jpg

image source: commons.wikimedia.org

london met deconstructivism libeskind pic from flickr.com

image source: rezamasoudi.blogspot.com

daniel libeskind deconstructvist architecture pic from http://www.spiegel.de/img/0,1020,129131,00.jpg

image source: www.spiegel.de

ontario royal museum deconstructivist interior design pic from http://www.square-mag.co.uk/2008/01/10/royal-ontario-museum-toronto/

image source: www.square-mag.co.uk

daniel libeskind interior pic from http://architectook.net/zlota-44/

image source: architectook.net

 

Born in postwar poland in 1946, became an american citizen in 1965.
daniel libeskind studied music in israel and in new york becoming
a virtuoso performer. he left music to study architecture receiving
his professional architectural degree at the cooper union for the
advancement of science and art in 1970 in new york city
and a postgraduate degree in history and theory of architecture
at the school of comparative studies at essex university in 1972.

daniel libeskind won the competition for the jewish museum
berlin in 1989, which opened to the public in september 2001
to wide public acclaim.
the city museum of osnabrück, germany, the felix nussbaum haus,
opened in july 1998. most recently, in july 2002,
the imperial war museum north in manchester opened to the public.
he is presently designing and constructing the spiral extension
to the victoria & albert museum, london;
the jewish museum in san francisco;
the jvc university - colleges of public administration, education and artrt &
architecture, guadalajara, mexico;
maurice wohl convention centre, bar ilan university, tel aviv;
atelier weil, a private atelier/gallery in mallorca, spain;
the extension to the denver art museum, denver, colorado,
a post graduate student center for the london metropolitan university
and the extension to the royal ontario museum, toronto.
in february 2003, he was awarded what is currently the most
wellknown building project worldwide:
the master plan design for ground zero and the world trade center site.

His work has been exhibited extensively in major museums and
galleries around the world and has also been the subject of
numerous international publications in many languages.
his ideas have influenced a new generation of architects
and those interested in the future development of cities and culture.
Info source: www.designboom.com

       

Pictures

 

gerhry deconstructivism architecture in dusseldorf

image source: thomasmayerarchive.de

kline picture from www.mlahanas.de

image source: www.waymarking.com

daniel libeskind deconstructivism design pic from http://torontoist.com/attachments/toronto_marcl/ROM_Crystal_1.jpg

image source: torontoist.com

deconstructivism design hadid vitra station pic from www.vitruvio.ch

image source: www.vitruvio.ch

hadid deconstructivist interior

image source: www.egodesign.ca

dubai decontructivsm design pic from http://www.building.co.uk/Pictures/316xAny/u/d/e/zaha_opus_6.jpg

image source: www.building.co.uk

zaha hadid decostructivist architecture pic from http://www.e-architect.co.uk/paris/jpgs/montpellier_zaha_hadid_06_6.jpg

image source: www.e-architect.co.uk

garofalo decostructivist architecture pic from www.apartmentherapy.comgarofalo deconstructivism interior design

image source: www.apartmenttherapy.com

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
Links  

more about deconstructivism: archilogy.com , www.absoluteastronomy.com

Peter Eisenmann's studio: www.eisenmanarchitects.com

more about Eisenman: www.designboom.com

Gehry and partners' studio : www.foga.com

Gehry's construction technology: www.gehrytechnologies.com

more about Gehry: www.history.com , www.pritzkerprize.com

Zaha Hadid Architects' studio: www.zaha-hadid.com

more about Zaha Hadid: www.designmuseum.org

Daniel Libeskind Studio: www.daniel-libeskind.com

more about Daniel Libeskind: www.designboom.com

 

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