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Sustainable Architecture

Ecodesign

Fay Jones

Ken Yeang

David Fisher

 

 

 

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david fisher rotatin solar skyscraper ecodesign pic from www.inhabitat.com

image source: www.inhabitat.com

 

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Sustainable Architecture  

mario cucinella architects solar ecodesign sustainabler architecture pic from

mario cucinella sieeb building ecodesign sustainable architecture pic from www.mcarchitects.it

image source: www.mcarchitects.it

ken yeang sustainable architecture pic form landscapeandurbanism.blogspot.com

image source: landscapeandurbanism.blogspot.com

sustainable eco skyscrapers pic from

diphros stool pic from www.architonic.com

image source: www.inhabitat.com

 

Sustainable architecture is the design of sustainable buildings. Sustainable architecture attempts to reduce the collective environmental impacts during the production of building components, during the construction process, as well as during the lifecycle of the building (heating, electricity use, carpet cleaning etc) This design practice emphasizes efficiency of heating and cooling systems, alternative energy sources such as solar hot water, appropriate building siting, reused or recycled building materials, on-site power generation (solar technology, ground source heat pumps, wind power), rainwater harvesting for gardening and washing, and on-site waste management such as green roofs that filter and control stormwater runoff. Sustainable architects design with sustainable living in mind.

Sustainable technologies are technologies which use less energy, fewer limited resources, do not deplete natural resources, do not directly or indirectly pollute the environment, and can be reused or recycled at the end of their useful life.

There is a significant overlap with appropriate technology, which emphasizes the suitability of technology to the context, in particular considering the needs of people in developing countries. However, the most appropriate technology may not be the most sustainable one; and a sustainable technology may have high cost or maintenance requirements that make it unsuitable as an "appropriate technology," as that term is commonly used.

The needed aim of sustainable design is to produce places, products and services in a way that reduces use of non-renewable resources, minimizes environmental impact, and relates people with the natural environment.

Sustainable design is often viewed as a necessary tool for achieving sustainability. It is related to the more heavy-industry-focused fields of industrial ecology and green chemistry, sharing tools such as life cycle assessment to judge the environmental impact or "greenness" of various design choices. Info source: www.wikipedia.org

       
Ecodesign  

cardboard chair ecodesign by frank o ghery pic from www.design-crisis.com

image source: design-crisis.com

ecodesign wine bottle furniture pic from www.ecofriendly.com

 

ecodesign chair made from recycled wine corks pic from

image source: www.ecofriend.org

 

verdi ecodesign armchair pic from www.treehugger.com

image source: www.treehugger.com

starck recycled material television ecodesign pic from

image source: www.tribu-design.com

mario cucinella ecodesign sustainable architecture pic from

image source: english.peopledaily.com.cn

 

Sustainable design (also referred to as "green design", "eco-design", or "design for environment") is the art of designing physical objects, the built environment and services to comply with the principles of economic, social, and ecological sustainability.

It ranges from the microcosm of designing small objects for everyday use, through to the macrocosm of designing buildings, cities, and the earth's physical surface. It is a growing trend within the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, urban planning, engineering, graphic design, industrial design, interior design and fashion design.

Low-impact materials: choose non-toxic, sustainably-produced or recycled materials which require little energy to process
Energy efficiency: use manufacturing processes and produce products which require less energy

Quality and durability: longer-lasting and better-functioning products will have to be replaced less frequently, reducing the impacts of producing replacements

Design for reuse and recycling: "Products, processes, and systems should be designed for performance in a commercial 'afterlife'."

Design Impact Measures for total earth footprint and life-cycle assessment for any resource use are increasingly required and available. Many are complex, but some give a quick and accurate whole earth estimates of impacts. One is estimating any spending as consuming an average economic share of global energy use as 8000btu/$ and CO2 production of .57kgCO2/$ (1995$) from DOE figures.

Sustainable Design Standards and project design guides are also increasingly available and are vigorously being developed by a wide array of private organizations and individuals. There is also a large body of new methods emerging from the rapid development of what has become known as 'sustainability science' promoted by a wide variety of educational and governmental institutions.

Biomimicry: "redesigning industrial systems on biological lines ... enabling the constant reuse of materials in continuous closed cycles..."[6]

Service substitution: shifting the mode of consumption from personal ownership of products to provision of services which provide similar functions, e.g. from a private automobile to a carsharing service. Such a system promotes minimal resource use per unit of consumption (e.g., per trip driven).[7]

Renewability: materials should come from nearby (local or bioregional), sustainably-managed renewable sources that can be composted (or fed to livestock) when their usefulness has been exhausted.


Healthy Buildings: sustainable building design aims to create buildings that are not harmful to their occupants nor to the larger environment. An important emphasis is on indoor environmental quality, especially indoor air quality.
Info source: www.wikipedia.org

       
Fay Jones  

fay jones pic from http://libinfo.uark.edu/specialcollections/news/featuredcollections.asp

image source: libinfo.uark.edu

fay jones

image source: blog.aia.org

thornocrown church ecodesign by fay jones pic from www.nationmaster.com

image source: www.nationmaster.com

sustainable architecture pinecote pavilion by fay jones pic from www.architectureweek.com

image source: www.architectureweek.com

fay jones collection between organic architecture and ecodesign pic from libinfo.uark.edu

fay jones sustainable architecture ecodesign pic from libinfo.uark.edu

image source: libinfo.uark.edu

 

Fay Jones was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, on January 31, 1921. He attended the University of Arkansas where he was in the first graduating class of the Architecture Department in 1950. In 1951 he obtained a Master of Architecture degree from Rice University. He then taught at the University of Oklahoma for two years where he worked with Bruce Goff.

During this same period, he met Frank Lloyd Wright and was accepted as a Taliesin Fellow. He was an apprentice at Taliesin in Wisconsin in 1953 and for the next 10 years participated in programs and events at Taliesin West in Arizona. In 1953 he returned to teach at the University of Arkansas, serving as professor and first Dean of the School of Architecture. From 1954 to 1998 he created a private practice from a small studio in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Professionally he was often referred to as E. Fay Jones. He was married to Mary Elizabeth, "Gus," Jones and they had two daughters. Fay Jones died in Fayetteville, Arkansas on August 31, 2004.

The principles of organic architecture shaped Jones's designs, and he developed his own distinctive style with an innovative vertical use of wood, stone, and glass that exhibits a constant awareness of the relationship between interior and exterior spaces of light.

He designed 226 projects, including residences, chapels, pavilions, and commercial and recreational buildings. His residences have received numerous awards. Eight buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. His most well-known projects are the Crosby Arboretum and Pinecote Pavilion in Picayune, Mississippi, the Cooper Chapel in Bella Vista, Arkansas, the Reed Residence in Hogeye, Arkansas, and the Thorncrown Chapel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. In 2006 Thorncrown won the AIA Twenty-five Year Award. In 1990 Fay Jones was awarded the AIA Gold Medal.

Info source: libinfo.uark.edu

       

Ken Yeang

 

ken yeang sustainable architecture ecodesign pic from wwww.yeangsquare.com

mesiniaga tower ecodesign sustainable architecture by ken yeang

image source: www.yangsquare.com

ken yeang sustainable veg.itecture pic from www.adarchitect.org

image source: www.madarchitect.org

 

Dr. Ken Yeang is the world's leading architect in ecological and passive low energy design. He has delivered over 200 built projects and his 'bioclimatic' towers have had an impact around the world, fusing high-tech and organic principles.

Born in Penang, Malaysia in 1948, Yeang was educated there, as well as in the U.S. and the UK, receiving his doctorate in Architecture from Cambridge University, and attending graduate courses at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard.

His expertise in the field of green design originated from his early doctoral dissertation from Cambridge University (1971-1974) followed by his ongoing R&D work, which has since led to the publication of a number of his treatises on the topic of ecological design and planning, bioclimatic design and high-rise design.

His publications include: "The Skyscraper: Bioclimatically Considered," "The Green Skyscraper: The Basis for Designing Sustainable, Intensive Buildings," and his latest book "Ecodesign: A manual for Ecological Design."

He is best known as the inventor of the Bioclimatic skyscraper (as a genre of low-energy skyscrapers based on bioclimatic design principles), and for his novel ideas on designing the high-rise building type as vertical urban design.

Info source: www.cnn.com

       
David Fisher  

diphros okladias pic from architonic.com

image source: www.inhabitat.com

dynamic architecture sustainablity and ecodesign by david fisher pic from

image source: equitygreen.typepad.com

david fisher ecodesign sustainable architecture technology pic from www.dynamicarchitecture.net

sustainable architecture dubai skyscraper by david fisher pic from www.dynamicarchitecture.net

da vinci rotating tower dubai ecodesign sustainable architecture by david fisher  pic from www.dynamicarchitecture.net

image source: www.dynamicarchitecture.net

 

 

Architect David Fisher, Italian Architect and Town Planner, incorporated dynamics in his buildings first in Italy, followed by Dubai, London, Moscow, Paris,and Hong Kong. According to Fisher, time is the most powerful dimension of life. “Time”, says Fisher “is the dimension of relativity”. His new skyscraper, the tower in motion, is shaped by “life designed by time”.

Dynamic architecture has also brought a revolution in construction techniques. It is in fact the first building produced in a factory, apart from the concrete core. All of its luxury units are manufactured in a factory, including all plumbing, electrical, air conditioning and installed on the concrete core right on location. Prefab construction and implementation offers high quality finishing, high quality control, much less life risks, and huge cost and time savings. Besides, this building, made of single separated floors offer higher seismic resistance than any other normal sky scraper.

The tower will have 48 wind turbines, positioned horizontally between each floors, thus generating green energy and function as a Power Station in the city. Each turbine can produce 0.3 megawatt of electricity, compared to 1-1.5 megawatt generated by a normal vertical turbine (windmill). Considering that Dubai gets 4,000 wind hours annually, the turbines incorporated into the building can generate 1,200,000 kilowatt-hour of energy.

The building will move with the sun to generate solar energy through solar panels positioned on the roof. The total energy produced by this inbuilt ‘powerhouse’ every year will be worth approximately seven million dollars. The particular design of the building and the carbon fiber special shape of the wings take care of the acoustics issues. Producing that much electric energy without any implication on the aesthetic aspect of the building is indeed a revolutionary step in tapping alternative energy sources.

With fourth dimension, time, woven into built fabric , architecture will no longer be confined. Dynamics will generate only one constant: change. Info source: vanibahl.wordpress.com

       

Pictures

 

atkins dubai sustainable architecture pic from www.treehugger.com

image source: www.treehugger.com

wired living home ecodesign sustainable architecture pic from http://www.pbs.org/kcet/wiredscience/story/104-wired_livinghome.html

image source: www.pbs.org

interior ecodesign pic from

interior ecodesign sustainable architecture pic from http://gemssty.com/2007/10/22/solar-power-skylight-in-one/

image source: gemssty.com

ecodesign sustainable architecture pic from www.inhabitat.com

image source: www.inhabitat.com

simpsons lee house ecodesign by glen murcutt pic from

image source: www.abc.net.au

metaform furniture ecodesign pic from www.globallygreenliving.com

image source: www.globallygreenliving.com

chair made of recycled material ecodesign pic from http://keetsa.com/blog/eco-friendly/what-happens-to-old-cutlery/image source: keetsa.com

masdar ecodesign sustainable architecture building pic from www.building.co.uk

masdar ecodesign sustainable architecture building pic from www.building.co.uk

image source: www.building.co.uk

   
       
Links

 

 

more about ecologic and sustainable design and architecture: www.wikipedia.org

excellent sustainable design and architecture site from wired.com: www.wired.com/promo/wiredlivinghome

more about sustainable eco-friendly materials : www.sustainablebuild.co.uk

more about Fay Jones: www.fayjones.org

more about Ken Yeang: www.cnn.com

Ken Yeang Veg.itecture: landscapeandurbanism.blogspot.com

David Fisher's Studio: www.dynamicarchitecture.net

more about dynamic architecture: vanibahl.wordpress.com

Mario Cucinella's ecodesign studio: www.mcarchitectsgate.it

news on ecologic design: www.treehugger.com , www.inhabitat.com

about ecologic building products: www.eco-buildingproducts.com

an interesting blog on ecodesign: www.archinect.com

more info on ecodesign by BBC Bloom:www.bbc.co.uk

more ecodesign and sustainable architecture links :www.ecodesignsociety.org , www.sustainableabc.com

 

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