idesign > styles > Gothic Revival

England, 1830 - 1900 AC

 

 

 

 

Gothic Revival Style

Gothic Revival Furniture

Pugin W.N.

 

 

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gothic revival style couch pic from www.philaantiques.com

image source:www.philaantiques.com

 

 

       
Gothic Revival Style  

gothic revival architecture pic from http://exhibits.slpl.org/scanned/pixel/ste01484.jpg

image source:exhibits.slpl.org

house of parliament gothic revival style pic from http://www.walktalktour.com/~blog/uploaded_images/L1-CP2-Houses-of-Parliament-725238.jpg

image source:www.walktalktour.com

 

The style period between 12th and 16th century is known as Gothic. This style derived from Roman architecture and was seen in France by the middle of the 12th century. It is characterized by the use of highly decorative panels and the use of indigenous woods. It was revived in England around 1740 and known as “Gothick." North Americans began to make their own versions in the mid 1800’s. Info source: restorations.net

Gothic Revival was the most influential style of the 19th century. Designs were based on forms and patterns used in the Middle Ages. Serious study was combined with a more fanciful, romantic vision of Medieval chivalry and romance. A wide range of religious, civic and domestic buildings were built and furnished in the Gothic Revival style, which flourished from 1830 to1900. Info source: www.vam.ac.uk

       
Gothic Revival Furniture  

gothic revival furniture pic from http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk

image source: special.lib.gla.ac.uk

 

The Gothic Revival style was based on the churches and homes of Europe in the Middles Ages and is considered the first true Victorian style. Sometimes called carpenter Gothic, these homes were often built by untrained builders from carpenter's pattern books. They have irregular pitched gable roofs, fanciful eave treatments, pointed arch windows, and sometimes elaborate Gothic ornamentation and details. Info source: www.sharonkramlich.com

Gothic buildings of the 12th to 16th centuries were a major source of inspiration to 19th-century designers. Architectural elements such as pointed arches, steep-sloping roofs and decorative tracery (ornamental openwork patterns) were applied to a wide range of Gothic Revival objects. Some pieces even look like miniature buildings. Info source: www.vam.ac.uk

       
Pugin W.N.  

gothic revival furniture pic from special.lib.gla.at.uk

image source: special.lib.gla.ac.uk

 
Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin
(1812 - 1852)
The writings of A.W.N. Pugin, particularly Contrasts (1836) and True Principles of Pointed or Christian Architecture (1842), had a major influence on the style and theory of the Gothic Revival. Pugin urged architects and designers to work from the fundamental principles of Medieval art. These included truth to structure, material and purpose. Info source: www.vam.ac.uk
         
       

Pictures

 

gothic revival at the 1851 expo pic from www.victorianweb.org

image source: www.victorianweb.org

 

 

 

gothic revival chair pic from www.rarevictorian.comimage source:www.rarevictorian.com

 

http://www.woodworkinghistory.com/images/neo-gothic_1901.jpgimage source:www.woodworkinghistory.com

gothic revival chair pic from http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/davs/ho_1995.111.htmimage source:www.metmuseum.org

gothic revival style furniture pic from http://www.ogallerie.com/auctions/2003-05/050858.jpgimage source:www.ogallerie.com

 

gothic revival chair pic from http://www.fantiques.com/periods/GOR.jpgimage source:www.fantiques.com

gothic revival psyche pic from rarevictorian.comimage source:rarevictorian.com

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
Links  

more about Medieval Gothic: iDesign / Keystones / Medieval

more about Victorian style : iDesign / Styles / Victorian

excellent site about Gothic Revival: www.vam.ac.uk

from Gothic to Neo-Gothic: www.arthistoryarchive.com

more Victorian Age furniture: rarevictorian.com

more about english styles: styles-and-periods.interiordezine.com

victorian style furniture seller : rarevictorian.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
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