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Lamps

 

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achille castiglioni arco lamp pic from www.design-conscious.co.uk

image source: www.design-conscious.co.uk

 

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Lamps  

lamps different shapes and types

image source: www.neon-lighting.com

botta design postmodernism pic from http://www.stylepark.com/it/artemide/shogun-tavolo

image source: www.stylepark.com

philippe stark gun lamps pop kitsch furniture design

image source: jiid.blogspot.com

mushroom shape lamps

image source: www.geekologie.com

 

Lamps, together with the fireplace, are probably the oldest light emitting device used by mankind in architecture. Naturally these type of devices, and the associated lighting technique which is called "task lighting", have been improved enormously during the evolution of theatre, architecture and interior design.

The widespread use of electric lighting began with the invention of the first practical incandescent lamp by Thomas Edison and Joseph Swan in the nineteenth century. Since then there have been significant improvements in lamp efficiency as well as the different types of lamp.

As discussed in the overview, light sources used today in architectural lighting can be divided into two main categories: incandescent and luminescent gasseous discharge lamps. The gaseous discharge type of lamp is either low or high pressure. Low-pressure gaseous discharge sources are the fluorescent and low-pressure sodium lamps. Mercury vapor, metal halide and high-pressure sodium lamps are considered high-pressure gaseous discharge sources.

These are the most common light sources used in the field architectural lighting. Each light source will be described in terms of its three primary components: (1) light-producing element (lamp), (2) enclosure (luminaire), and (3) electrical connection.

info source: www.neon-lighting.com

       
Links  

more about lamps: www.neon-lighting.com

more about interior design lighting: ezinearticles.com

 

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