idesign > Keystones > Italian Majolica

Italy, 14th Century AC

 

 

 

 

Italian Majolica

Andrea Della Robbia

 

 

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andrea della robbia "testa di fanciulla" pic from www.sapere.it

image source: www.sapere.it

 

 

       
Italian Majolica  

italian majolica picture from www.thetuscankitchen.com

Info source: www.thetuscankitchen.com

  "By the 11th century this art form was flourishing and Islamic ceramists were producing richly decorated pieces of lusterware used to adorn many civic and religious buildings. As traders traveled, so did the ceramics; through northern Africa, through Moorish Spain to the island of Majorca. In the early 13th century, Majorca was one of the major ports used by trading vessels travelling between Spain and Italy. Regardless of it’s place of origin, the tin-glazed ceramics being imported into Italy, through Majorca, came to be referred to as Majolica. It was not long before the Italians started to create their own tin-glazed pottery, initially functional items. It was during the Renaissance, when art for the sake of art starts to be seen, that the talented Italian ceramists and artists elevate decorating pottery to the artform that remains to this day". Info source: www.italianmajolica.com
       
Andrea della Robbia  

andrea della robbia majolica pic from www.metmuseum.org

Info source: www.metmuseum.com

  "The Florentine sculptor (1399–1482) used tin glaze in a new and imaginative way, by mixing batches of white glaze with oxides of various metals in a finely powdered form. When fired, the resulting glazes were colored in their entire mass with blues from cobalt, yellows from antimony, greens from copper, purples and violets from manganese, and oranges and browns from iron rust. These colored glazes were applied to the already fired terracotta sculptures in a liquid form with water admixed, and fixed in a second firing. They covered the sculptures with washes of color in areas needed for clothing and background details, much as paints would do for a picture. The colors were permanent and could be exposed to the weather". Info source: www.metmuseum.com
         
       

Pictures

 

www.italianceramicshop.com

image source: wwww.italianceramicshop.com

 

 

 

italian majolica pic from www.italianmajolica.comimage source: www.italianmajolica.com

majolica vases pic from www.faccents.comimage source: wwww.faccents.com

andrea della robbia ceramic pic from www.panoramio.comimage source: wwww.panoramio.com

 

 

 

 

   
       
Links  

majolica history: www.thetuscankitchen.com

majolica manufacturer: www.thetuscankitchen.com

Andrea Della Robbia: www.metmuseum.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
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