idesign > Keystones > Medieval Gothic Interiors

Europe, 5th - 14th Century BC

 

 

Savonarola Chair

Chest

Canopy Bed

Table

Cabinet Buffet

Dressoir

Stool

Carpet

Tapestry

Lectern

Pictures

Links

help

 

 

 

gothic furniture pic from wikipedia

image source: www.gutenberg.org

 

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Savonarola Chair  

savonarola chair from www.oldfurniture.net

image source: www.oldfurniture.net

  "A classic 15th-century scissor chair was named after the charismatic Dominican monk Girolamo Savonarola. Once, only the most wealthy could afford an exquisite, hand-carved chair with the scissor-like principle that allowed it to be folded and easily moved". Info source: www.designtoscano.com
       
Chest  

chest picture from www.traditionalengllishwoodwork.com

image source: www.traditionalenglishwoodwork.com

  "Later Roman chests derived their style from the burial sarcophagus made of marble and heavily carved. The chest continued to have a security function: housing the owner's valuables in a relatively portable form but strong enough to deter thieves. The French nobility led a semi-nomadic life traveling from one castle or home to another and taking their furniture with them. The portability and versatility of chests came in handy for transporting textiles and other valuables as well as serving as seats, tables and other functions on arrival at each location". Info source: www.mmarkley.com
       
Canopy Bed  

medieval room pic from www.costumes.org

image source: www.costumes.org

 

  "Although there were canopies and curtains, these weren’t the full four poster beds with poles at each corner which started to arrive in the 15th century. In the late Middle Ages the best beds had hangings draped from a frame which was suspended from the ceiling beams (see left), sometimes supported by a tall bedhead too, and often with a canopy called a tester or celure. The actual bedstead was usually an independent structure within all the finery. Beds tended to be quite high and might be raised further by being set on a platform". Info source: www.oldandinteresting.com
       
Table  

medieval table pic from www.

image source: www.stuartinteriors.ltd.uk

 

"Tables were perhaps the earliest indicators that a nomadic existence was waning in Medieval Europe. Large planks on saw-horses gave way to fabricated tables with central stretchers descended from the communal tables de monastère or refectory tables used in the dining halls of monasteries. Making possible shared meals and socializing cemented the importance of the table from the dawn of European history through to our own time.

Throughout the Middle Ages, the primary functions of the table were for eating and for displaying items. It was not until the Renaissance that tables began to be designed for more specific functions such as gaming and writing". Info source: www.mmarkley.com

       

Cabinet Buffet

 

buffet pic from www.gutenberg.com

image source: www.gutenberg.org

 

"The cabinet traces its ancestry to the chest, which when turned onto its front or back panel and hoisted onto a platform became a cabinet with a lid which became a door. Two chests mounted on top of one another in this manner formed the original bahut-deux-corps or two-piece cabinet.

The stylistic evolution of cabinets is a rich one, especially in the Middle Ages and Renaissance whose 19th century revival figures so large in the Château des Bois CollectionTM. During the Middle Ages, cabinets served not only a storage function but also display. They grew ever larger in size as their owners sought more surfaces upon which to display silver, ceramics and other material indicators of their wealth and status". Info source: www.mmarkley.com

       
Dressoir  

gothic dressoir from www.rijksmuseum.nl

image source: www.rijksmuseum.nl

  "The dressoir is a cabinet with a central case at eye level, usually having a door on either side of a central panel. Below the case is an open area with a pot board, a few inches above the floor, to display large items such as platters and vases. Examples of dressoirs can be found in numerous paintings and illuminated manuscripts from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including works by Rogier van der Weyden and other Flemish masters". Info source: www.mmarkley.com
       
Stool  

medieval stool reproduction from www.bloodandsawdust.com

image source: www.bloodandsawdust.com

 

"It was for many centuries the standard seating arrangement for the majority of people; a chair (a seat with a back) was reserved only for the most important personages.

Early stools were usually supported by three splayed legs let into the seat in the same way as the legs of early benches. A more developed form was the stool made like a miniature trestle table, having two solid sides connected by a substantial stretcher". Info source: www.taunton.com

       
Carpet  

gothic carpet pic from www.artlex.com

image source: www.artlex.com

  Carpets were probably first made by nomadic peoples to cover the earthen floor in their tents. It is not certain however, if the Egyptians, the Chinese, or even the Mayas first invented carpet making. It is quite possible that many peoples, none of whom were in contact with each other, began to make carpets at about the same time.

When Cyrus conquered Babylon in 539 BC, he was struck by its splendour, and it was probably he who introduced the art of carpet making into Persia. It is said that the tomb of Cyrus, who was buried at Pasargadae (Persepolis), was covered with precious carpets. Even before his time, it is very likely that Persian nomads knew about the use of Knotted carpets. Their herds of sheep and goats provided them with high quality and durable wool for this purpose. Info source: www.farhangsara.com

       

Tapestry

 

la dame a la licorne picture from www.icentre.com

image source: www.icentre.com

 

 

"Tapestries became status symbols amongst the aristocracy in the Middle Ages. They also had much practical use, providing insulation for castle walls, covering openings and giving privacy around beds. Kings and nobles took them on their travels from castle to castle for reasons of comfort and prestige. Tapestries often changed hands after battle, and since the victor's door and window openings might be a different size the acquired hangings might be cut up or even joined to other tapestries".

"Many of the best known works such as the 'Lady with the Unicorn' series were woven at the turn of the 15th century in the Loire valley". Info source: www.tapestry-art.com

       
Lectern  

lectern pic from

image source: www.gutenberg.org

 

 

 
A reading desk, often in the shape of an eagle, made to hold the Bible during services. Usually made of brass.Info source: www.britanniaexpress.com
       

Pictures

 

medieval pic from pl

image source: www.pilgrimfathersorigins.org

 

 

 

medieval bed pic fromimage source:www.oldandinteresting.com

medieval couple pic from karenswhimsy.comimage source:karenswhimsy.com

stuart interior pic from www.stuartinteriors.ltd.ukimage source: www.stuartinteriors.ltd.uk

 

 

 

 

   
       
Links  

more about medieval furniture: www.mmarkley.com

history of carpet: www.farhangsara.com

medieval tapestry:www.tapestry-art.com

savonarola chair seller: www.designtoscano.com

medieval furniture seller: www.mmarkley.com

old furniture manufacturer: www.oldfurniture.net

stuart interiors: www.stuartinteriors.ltd.uk

woodwork manufacturer: www.traditionalenglishwoodwork.com

medieval costumes: www.costumes.org

medieval design: www.medievaldesign.com

 

 

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