idesign > styles > Minimalism

1950s - 21st Century AC

 

 

Minimalism

 

Fumihiko Maki

Tadao Ando

Louis Barragan

Alberto Campo Baeza

 

Minimalist Interiors

 

 

 

Pictures

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ancient greece furniture drawings from www.zeno.org

image source: www9.georgetown.edu

 

 

       

Minimal

 

frank stella black series

image source: momahildawa.blogspot.com

donald judd minimal art texas marfa

image source: www.townandcountrytravelmag.com

koshino house rendering  pic from www.arkitera.com

image source: forum.arkitera.com

koshino house minimalist interior pic from http://www.3dallusions.com/pbarrelas/maxwell_gallery/koshinoHouse.jpg

image source: www.filterforge.com

minimalism architecture pic from http://repository.demaniore.com/galleries/progetti/500_casa24_casa-x-20080507082814_z2.jpg

image source: repository.demaniore.com

 

An American-born movement, Minimalism stemmed mostly from the work of Frank Stella, whose Black Paintings were first exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1959, inspiring many artists to turn away from the expressive art of the past. Although it was never an organized, self-proclaimed movement, Minimalist art became dominant in sculpture and installation work, although there are multiple Minimalist painters. The 1966 exhibition in New York entitled "Primary Structures" was a key event in the history of the movement. Info source: wwar.com

Minimal art is characterized by its simplicity in both form and content, where personal expression is removed in order to achieve this. The intention of minimalist artists is to allow the audience to view a composition more intensely because the distractions of theme etc. have been removed. Info source: www.arthistoryguide.com

In the field of architecture, the term Minimalism was used, at times with caution and at others with determination, to connote the works of architects from profoundly different origins and cultural backgrounds, who had based their own work on a reduction in expressive media, a rediscovery of the value of empty space and a radical elimination of everything that does not coincide with a programme, also with minimalistic design overtones, of extreme simplicity and formal cleanliness.

Having initially been a reaction to the nightmare of the supermarket and excess, in its architectural form Minimalism is now finding goals that go further than the pure, simple motive of denunciation and instead move towards concrete attempts, albeit thinly scattered over time and space and in modest quantities, to introduce a life more imbued with spirituality, clarity and harmony.Info source: www.arcspace.com

       
Fumihiko Maki  

 

fumihiko maki minimalist architecture pic from arcspace.com

image source: www.arcspace.com

diphros okladias pic from architonic.com

image source:www.gradst.hr

fumihiko minimalism design pic from flickr.com

image source:flickr.com

 

In Fumihiko Maki this approach, urban aggregations are envisaged as coming into being over time in a particular way through a system of generative elements that determine the general building pattern. This catalytic concept, plus the notion of building the city through the creation of ‘artificial ground’, enabled him to approach the problem of late modern development in a more dynamic, open ended way. In 1965 Maki returned to Japan where he started his own practice with the hillside terrace apartments; a medium rise scheme that has been under development in Tokyo since 1966 to the present. There is perhaps no other privately sponsored residential neighbouhood in the world that has been realised incrementally in such a coherent way. Info source: www.geocities.com

Maki's designs exhibit carefully manipulated shapes and textures that humanize their total effect. Maki displays a constant concern with contextual response. Maki applies his belief in standardized parts and adaptability in a very pragmatic way. His design attention is not the glorification of his theories, but the successful employment of them to create effective architecture that meets human needs.

Maki has been studying traditional Japanese architecture which he has begun incorporating into his design work. Maki's design work is remarkably mature, not merely in choice of concept, but in terms of compositional sophistication as well. Info source: architects.greatbuildings.com

       
Tadao Ando  

ando house hirano pic from http://srt251ocs.blogspot.com/2008/05/major-project-research.html

image source: srt251ocs.blogspot.com

tadao interior design

tada ando armani theatre pic from flickr.com

image source: kwc.org

ando interior design minimimalist pic from kwg.org

image source: www.flickr.com

morimoto minimalism by tadao ando

morimoto restaurant minimalism design pic from www.coolboom.net

image source: www.coolboom.net

 

Tadao Ando was born in Osaka, Japan in 1941. Unlike most contemporary architects, Ando did not receive any formal architectural schooling. Instead, he trained himself by reading and traveling extensively through Africa, Europe, and the United States. In 1970 he established Tadao Ando Architect & Associates.

Ando rejects the rampant consumerism visible within much of today's architecture. He responds both sensitively and critically to the chaotic Japanese urban environment, but maintains a connection to the landscape. Although Ando rejects cultural fads, he uses materials and forms to incorporate the materialism of modern society into his architecture. Accordingly, his concrete and glass buildings reflect, the modern progress underway in both Japan and the world.

In opposition to traditional Japanese architecture, Ando creates spaces of enclosure rather than openness. He uses walls to establish a human zone and to counter the monotony of commercial architecture. On the exterior, the wall deflects the surrounding urban chaos, while on the interior it encloses a private space.

Ando developed a radically new architecture characterized by the use of unfinished reinforced concrete structures. Using a geometric simplicity which reveals a subtlety and richness in spatial articulation, Ando has generated an architecture that shares the serenity and clarity that characterize traditional Japanese architecture. Info source: www.archiplanet.org

 

Tadao Ando is Japan's leading architect and a designer with a dazzling international reputation. This complete catalogue of Ando's work examines in detail over one hundred buildings and projects, illustrated by drawings, sketches, plans and other material from the architect's own studio. Info source: archinform.net

Ando conceives his projects as places of habitation not as abstract designs in a landscape. It is not surprising that he is often referred to by his professional peers and critics as being as much a builder as an architect. That emphasizes how important he considers craftsmanship in accomplishing his designs. He requires absolute precision in the making and casting of his concrete forms to achieve the smooth, clean and perfect concrete for his structures.

As a self-taught architect, with no architectural degree or even training with a master architect, Ando attributes his development to extensive reading and a number of study trips to Europe and the United States to see actual buildings from history. He kept detailed sketch books of all his travels which he still does to this day.

Info source: www.pritzkerprize.com

       
Louis Barragàn  

louis barragan minimalist interio pic from http://www.casaluisbarragan.org/fotos/fotoscasa/escalerabiblioteca.jpg

image source: www.casaluisbarragan.org

louis barragan minimalism pic from http://www.thequietman.org/imagenes/barragan%20cuadra%20san%20cristobal.jpg

image source: www.thequietman.org

 

Luis Barragàn (1902-1988) was one of Mexico’s most influential 20th century architects. Famed for his mastery of space and light, he reinvented the International Style as a colourful, sensuous genre of Mexican modernism.

Barragán transformed the International Style into a vibrant, sensuous Mexican aesthetic by adding vivid colours and textural contrasts and accentuating his buildings' natural surroundings.He once said that light and water were his favourite themes, and soon became skilled at manipulating them both in buildings like the 1966 Folke Egerstrom House and Stables built around a brightly coloured, sculptural sequence of horse pools (Barragán loved horse riding) and the 1975-77 Francisco Gilardi House framing an indoor pool. Info source: www.designmuseum.org

       

Alberto Campo Baeza

 

campo baeza minimalism design pic http://blog-static.excite.eu/it/blogs/archipietra/share/img/baeza.jpg

image source: archipietra.blog.excite.it

campo baeza minimalism architecture pic from flickr.com

campo baeza minimalist design

image source: flckr.com

http://www.iaacblog.com/digitaltectonics/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/campo-baeza_casa-gaspar_blog.jpg

image source: www.iaacblog.com

 

 

Campo Baeza's most characteristic architecture preserves features of de la Sota severely rational compositional style, though the influences on his work are not just Spanish.

Moreover, Campo Baeza's poetics is the outcome of a complex and wide-ranging dialogue with architectural history that has provided him no so much with a set of formal models as with a repertoire of compositional strategies, raising questions of method which he has answered by inverting Mies van der Rohe's celebrated dictum »less is more« to give »más con menos«, more with less.

The fact that achieving »more with less« is Campo Baeza's ultimate aim, and that variation rather than variety is one of the fundamental and most characteristic techniques he employs in his architecture, only goes to show how superficial the efforts of critics have been in attempting to reduce the tectonic austerity and luminarist poetry of his buildings to just another form of minimalism.


Campo Baeza's simplified assemblies of primary geometric forms carry the rejection of decoration to disconcerting, almost hermetic extremes. Eliminating the superfluous and doing everything possible to communicate what remains by means of essentiality -a more conceptual notion than minimalism in that suggests simplification and purification, an expression of essence - is both the primary aim and the message of Campo Baeza's architecture.

The pure, dazzling whiteness to which his buildings and interiors aspire, and in many cases attain, is only the most obvious of the effects Campo Baeza is striving to achieve. What the architecture surveyed in this book conveys more than anything is a sense of timelessness and other-wilderness. Though his ability to reflect the secondary features of what constitutes the essential fascination of the modern, Campo Baeza shows us that the present is essentially an inhospitable and uninhabitable place. It is this existential insight that achieves architectural form in his buildings. Info source: ita.archinform.net

       
Minimalist Design  

minimalist bedroom pic from http://www.kmpfurniture.com/fire_collection/category/bedrooms_4.html

image source: www.kmpfurniture.com

minimalist design living room pic from www.livingpod.com

image source: www.livingpod.com

contemporary minimalist living room rendering pic from http://www.cairns.com.au/article/2008/01/22/993_local-it-news.html

image source: www.cairns.com.au

 

minimalist design pic from www.deezen.com

image source: www.dezeen.com

outdoor patio minimalism design pic from http://www.furniturestoreblog.com/architecture/?page=4

image source:www.furniturestoreblog.com

 

Minimalism in interior design is a process in which aesthetics and functionality are employed to create an astonishing effect without the influence of superfluous elements.

Its essence can be found in the Mies van der Rohe edict, "less is more", and its intention is to accommodate life simply but beautifully. With its neutral palette and a natural materials such as wood, steel , glass and limestone, there's no mistaking, this is a minimalist designed interior where : Design is present only in its Spiritual form. Info source: www.livingpod.com

The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs. The structure's beauty is also determined by playing with lighting, using the basic geometric shapes as outlines, using only a single shape or a small number of like shapes for components for design unity, using tasteful non-fussy bright color combinations, usually natural textures and colors, and clean and fine finishes. Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone and wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics.

The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, etcetera), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with machines, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows.

Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed may have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. Info source: wikipedia.org

       

Pictures

 

castello minimalism design pic from http://goenzarch.multiply.com/journal?&page_start=80

image source: goenzarch.multiply.com

chilean minimalism design house pic from http://gliving.tv/architecture-design/chilean-wall-house-minimalists-take-notice/

image source:gliving.tv

la dimora minimalist design pic from www.tuvie.com

image source:www.tuvie.com

brick house minimalism design pic from http://www.brick.org.uk/case-studies/monastic-minimalism.html

image source: www.brick.org.uk

minimalist kitchen design pic from http://www.fashionoffice.org/interior/2008/format5-2008.htm

image source: www.fashionoffice.org

3d reconstruction from www.vizing.org

image source: www.mocoloco.com

 

vals thermal centre pic from http://www.archinect.com/schoolblog/entry.php?id=14045_0_39_0_C

image source: www.archinect.com

mimalist thermal centre pic from http://www.architetturadipietra.it/blog/allegati/vals2.jpg

image source: www.archinect.com

terme vals minimalist design pic from http://designcorner.blinkr.net/design*news/www.modusfurniture.co.uk?page=622

image source:www.mimoa.eu

minimalim design rendering pic from http://naomiclare.files.wordpress.com/2008/02/6-interior-cast-light-view.jpg

image source: naomiclare.files.wordpress.com

 

   
       
Links  

 

more about minimalism : wwar.com , www.arthistoryguide.com , www.arcspace.com , www.livingpod.com

Maki & associates studio: www.maki-and-associates.co.jp

more about Fumihiko Maki: architects.greatbuildings.com

more about Tadao Ando: www.pritzkerprize.com , archinform.net , www.archiplanet.org

more about Louis Barragan : www.designmuseum.org

more about Alberto Campo Baeza: archinform.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
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