idesign > Keystones > Wiener Secession

Austria, 1897 - 1905 AC

 

 

Sezessionstil

Otto Wagner

J.M. Olbrich

Joseph Hoffmann

 

 

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secessio stil olbrich building pic from www.nga.gov

image source:www.nga.gov

   
       

Sezessionstil

 

vienna secession ver sacrum pic from http://home.planet.nl/~voogt053/Pics/LanceCorporal.jpg

image source:home.planet.nl

moser ver sacrum pic from www.art-for-a-change.com

image source:www.art-for-a-change.com

vienna secession poster pic from www.vandaprints.com/lowres

image source:www.vandaprints.com

 

In 1897 a group of Artists, such as Otto Wagner and his gifted students Gustav Klimt, Kolomon Moser, Josef Hoffman, and Joseph Maria Olbrich declared their official rejection of the tightfisted Academy of Fine Arts and the Kunstlerhaus exhibition society in 1897. Gustav Klimt and Kolomon Moser moved like the tide to bring together Symbolists, Naturalists, Modernists, and Stylists. And while the group largely consisted of artists and architects, it did give birth to a flourishing graphic design movement.

The design style of the Secession movement was fluid, with a sweet melancholy echoing through its smooth lines. Though its early work was essentially within the Art Nouveau style, the Secession did exhibit more rectilinear tendencies. The movement promoted their design aesthetic with exhibition posters and its own journal, Ver Sacrum (Sacred Spring). The journal housed reproductions, poetry illustrations, graphic art, decorative borders, object design, and cutting-edge conceptions for layout. More importantly, Ver Sacrum introduced foreign designs to Vienna, most notably the Japanese block prints that so greatly influenced the Secession’s two-dimensional style. Info source: www.artandculture.com

       
Otto Wagner  

otto wagner chair pic from www.architonic.com

image source:www.architonic.com

otto wagner interior design postparkasse pic from http://hdri.cgtechniques.com/~postspar/show.php?id=237

image source:hdri.cgtechniques.com

 

Otto Wagner (b. Penzing, Vienna 1841; d. Vienna 1918) studied at the Technische Hochschule in Vienna, at the Berlin Bauakademie, and at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. In 1894 he supervised and taught at a special school of architecture within the Academy of Fine Arts. Info source:www.archiplanet.org

In 1899 Otto Wagner joined the Viennese Secession. Otto Wagner's most important works of architecture and urban planning include laying out the Viennese urban railway (1892-1901) with viaducts, bridges, and more than thirty stops as well as the am Steinhof church (1902-1907). The building he designed as the Austrian Postsparkasse (1904-1906) is regarded as Otto Wagner's masterpiece, both aesthetically and technically. Otto Wagner conceived this building as a total work of art, using not only the newest materials such as reinforced concrete and aluminium; he also designed the entire interior, which reveals early functionalist tendencies, and used new methods of furniture-making. Info source: www.wagner-otto.com

 

       
Olbrich  

olbrich furniture pic from www.artnet.com

image source:www.artnet.com

chairs and bench design olbrich pic from http://www.city-antik.at/of_furnit1.htm

image source:www.city-antik.at

 

Joseph Maria Olbrich was born in Silesia, Germany in 1867. He studied architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and won the Rome Prize in his third year. After working in Otto Wagner's office for a short time, he travelled through Europe. When he returned to Vienna he helped form the Secession, an anti-traditionalist forum. Intent on creating "new" art, the Secessionists looked to British architects like Mackintosh and Baillie-Scott for inspiration and direction.

Notable for combining monumentality with delicacy, Olbrich relieved the formality of flat stucco buildings with organic detailing. In 1899 Olbrich was invited by the Grand Duke of Hesse to establish an Artists' Colony at Darmstadt in Germany where he created his own brand of rectilinear, wood-based Art Nouveau. His designs were an inspiration to such initiators of the Modern Movement as Frank Lloyd Wright. Info source:www.artificeimages.com

       
Hoffmann  

hoffmann stoclet palace pic from www.arcspace.com

image source:www.arcspace.com

stoclet palace inteior pic from www.latribunedelart.com

image source: www.latribunedelart.com

 

Josef Hoffmann (1870-1956), Austrian architect and decorator, was a pioneer of European modernism and founder of the Wiener Werkstätte (Viennese Workshop).

During his studies and early professional years Hoffmann assimilated the historicist architectural traditions of Vienna, as exemplified in the work of Hasenauer and Wagner (among others); Wagner's functionalistic theories; the stylistic experimentations of the European Art Nouveau; and the teachings of the English arts and crafts movement. Hoffmann's earliest independent works, such as the rooms of the second, third, and fourth exhibitions at the Vienna Secession that he designed in 1899 and the remodelling of the store Am Hof 3 in Vienna the same year, showed clearly the influence of Art Nouveau and of the English arts and crafts.Info source: www.answers.com

       

Pictures

 

wiener secession inteiror pic from www.tate.org.uk

image source: www.tate.org.uk

 

 

hoffmann design chair pic from www.moma.orgimage source:www.moma.org

wiener secession klimt painting pic from http://www.museumonline.at/1999/schools/via/kempten/D/Kunst/Malerei/klimt.htmimage source:www.museumonline.at

klimt art noveau giuditta painting pic from http://www.moleiro.com/shop/art-shop-images.php?p=1171/itimage source: www.moleiro.com

secession stil building pic from http://www.achome.co.uk/vienna/index.php?page=homeimage source:www.achome.co.uk

olbrich building vienna secession pic from www.e-architect.co.ukimage source: www.e-architect.co.uk

otto wagner majolica house pic from http://www.achome.co.uk/vienna/index.php?page=homeimage source:www.achome.co.uk

   
       
Links  

360° visualization of Hoffmann's furniture iDesign / Design Objects / DS Series

more about Secession Stil: www.artandculture.com

more about Otto Wagner: www.wagner-otto.com

more about J.M Olbrich: www.artificeimages.com

more about Josef Hoffmann: www.arthistoryguide.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
       
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